Average Salary in Italy 2022

How much does an Italian worker make?

Working in Italy normally brings in a monthly salary of 3,650 EUR. The salaries vary from 920 to 16,300 EUR.

Taking housing, transportation, and other amenities into account, this is what the typical person makes each month. Depending on a person’s field of work, salaries might vary greatly.

There are many different types of jobs in Italy, so the salaries vary greatly. Some positions may pay very little, while others may offer a much higher salary. Take note that these are averages, so some people may make more or less than these amounts.

The most common type of job in Italy is in the service industry. This includes jobs such as waiters, bartenders, and retail workers. These positions typically pay around 1,000 EUR per month.

Average salary in Europe

Jobs in the manufacturing and industrial sector are also common in Italy. These jobs may pay a bit more, with an average salary of around 1,500 EUR per month.

There are also many jobs in the tourism and hospitality industry in Italy. These positions may pay anywhere from 1,200 to 3,000 EUR per month.

Italy is home to many large corporations, so there are also many high-paying jobs available. Jobs in finance and accounting tend to pay very well, with salaries of 4,000 EUR or more per month.

Overall, the average salary in Italy is 3,650 EUR per month. This amount can vary greatly depending on a person’s field of work. Some jobs may pay very little, while others may offer a much higher salary.

Italy’s Salary Structure

Pay Scale

Italy’s monthly wage ranges from 920 EUR to 16,300 EUR. The average salary in Italy is 4,750 EUR per month. The country’s highest earners make around 16,300 EUR while the lowest-paid workers receive 920 EUR on a monthly basis.

Italy’s tax system is progressive, meaning that those who earn more money pay higher rates of tax. The highest income bracket is taxed at 43%, while the lowest bracket pays 20%. This means that the highest earners take home an average of 9,290 EUR after taxes, while the weakest earners take home 744 EUR.

Median Wage

The median monthly wage is 3,720 EUR, which implies that half of the population (50%) earns less than 3,720 EUR, while the other half earns more than 3,720 EUR.

The top 10% of earners make more than 7,560 EUR per month. The top 1% of earners make more than 16,300 EUR per month. The bottom 10% of earners make 920 EUR or less per month. The bottom 1% of earners make 490 EUR or less per month.

Percentiles

Around two-fifths of the population earns more than 2,090 EUR, while fewer than a quarter earn less than that amount. The top 5% of earners make more than 8,040 EUR a month, while the bottom 5% make 1,950 EUR or less.

Italy’s richest 10% earn more than 7,560 EUR per month on average. The poorest 10% earn 920 EUR or less per month. The middle class is defined as those earning between 2,090 and 8,040 EUR.

Is there a difference between average vs median incomes?

Both average salary and median income are indicators. However, while average salary provides information on the arithmetic mean of all salaries earned in a particular country, median income gives us an insight into the incomes of 50% of the workers. In other words, it is a more representative measure.

Comparison of Earnings based on Years of Work Experience

How does salary progress in Italy?

The average salary in Italy depends on a number of factors, including your experience and education. In general, entry-level salaries are lower than the national average, while those with more experience tend to earn more.

In Italy, there are progressive income tax rates, which means that those who earn more pay a higher percentage of their income in taxes. Therefore, when considering salary, it is important to take into account the amount of taxes that will be deducted from your paycheck.

Furthermore, the cost of living in Italy can vary depending on the city in which you live. For instance, Rome and Milan are more expensive than smaller cities.

The following table shows the average salary in Italy based on years of work experience:

  • 0-5 years: €22,716
  • 5-10 years: €32,032
  • 10-15 years: €37,104
  • 15-20 years: €41,280
  • 20+ years: €46,752

Comparing Salaries Based on Education in Italy

How much of a difference does education make in terms of pay?

In Italy, there is a significant difference in the average salaries of those with different levels of education. Workers with tertiary education (university degree or higher) earn an average of €30,000 per year. This is almost double the salary of someone with only a secondary education, who earns an average of €16,500 per year.

There is also a difference in the type of work that people with different levels of education tend to do. In Italy, over 70% of workers with a tertiary education work in professional, scientific and technical jobs. This compares to just under 50% of workers with only secondary education.

Earning a higher salary is not the only benefit of getting a university education. Workers with tertiary education are also more likely to be employed full-time and have access to better working conditions and greater job security.

So if you’re thinking about furthering your education, it’s worth considering all of the benefits that come with it, not just the financial ones.

Are Master’s and MBA degrees beneficial?

In Italy, having a Master’s or MBA degree can give your career a significant boost. Workers with these qualifications earn an average of €39,000 per year, which is almost €10,000 more than those with just a bachelor’s degree.

Master’s and MBA graduates also have better job prospects than those with lower levels of education. In Italy, over 90% of workers with these qualifications are employed full-time, compared to just over 60% of those with only a bachelor’s degree.

So if you’re thinking about studying for a higher degree, it could be worth considering a Master’s or MBA. These qualifications can lead to better jobs and higher salaries, giving you a major advantage in your career.

Gender-Based Salary Comparisons in Italy

On average, men workers in Italy earn 6% more than their female colleagues across all industries. This gender pay gap has remained relatively stable over the past five years.

When comparing average salaries by gender, men earn more than women in all industries except for two: education and health. In these sectors, women earn 3% and 5% more than men, respectively.

The largest gender pay gap is found in the banking and financial services industry, where men earn 18% more than women. This is followed by the information technology sector (16%), and the manufacturing and industrial sector (15%).

In general, men workers in Italy earn 6% more than their female colleagues across all industries. This gender pay gap has remained relatively stable over the past five years.

When comparing average salaries by gender, men earn more than women in all industries except for two: education and health. In these sectors, women earn 3% and 5% more than men, respectively.

The largest gender pay gap is found in the banking and financial services industry, where men earn 18% more than women. This is followed by the information technology sector (16%), and the manufacturing and industrial sector (15%).

In general, men workers in Italy earn 6% more than their female colleagues across all industries. This gender pay gap has remained relatively stable over the past five years.

Italy’s Average Yearly Income Increase Percentage

How much do yearly wage increases in Italy cost? How frequently do workers get a pay increase?

Every 17 months, the average Italian worker can expect to see an 8% bump in their take-home pay. The cost of living in Italy has increased by 2.5% in the last year. In order to maintain their purchasing power, Italians will need to see an annual salary increase of 3%.

The Italian government has put into place a series of measures meant to help workers keep up with the rising cost of living. These measures include a new law that allows for more flexible working hours and a higher minimum wage. The government has also increased the amount of money that families can receive in child benefits.

While these measures may help to some extent, it is still likely that many Italians will find it difficult to make ends meet. The high cost of living, combined with low wages, means that many people are struggling to get by. It is hoped that the measures put in place by the government will help to ease the financial burden on Italian families.

Italy’s 2022 Industry-Specific Annual Growth Rate

  • Construction – 9%
  • Banking – 6%
  • Healthcare – 4%
  • Information Technology – 3%
  • Education – 6%

In recent years, Italy’s economy has been growing steadily. This is expected to continue in 2022, with some industries seeing significant growth. Construction is forecast to grow by 9%, banking by 6%, healthcare by 4%, and information technology by 3%.

This means that average salaries in Italy are likely to increase across the board next year.

If you’re thinking of moving to Italy or starting a new job there, it’s worth considering what salary you could expect to earn. With an understanding of the average salary in Italy, you can be sure that you’re getting paid what you’re worth.

Average Pay Raise Rates by Level of Experience

Italian workers at a junior level may receive around a 3-5% salary increase in 2022. Mid-level workers may receive around a 4-6% salary increase and experienced level workers may get a 5-7% salary increase in 2022.

Note: The above rates are only averages and will depend on the company, sector, and specific role. There are also a number of other factors that will affect salaries in 2022, such as skills shortages and inflation.

Italy’s Bonus & Reward Systems

How frequently and how much are bonuses awarded to Italian workers?

When asked about bonuses and incentives, 45% of Italian employees indicated they had none, while 55% said they had gotten some kind of monetary reward.

Bonuses ranged from 3% to 6% of yearly compensation for those who received them. The median amount was 1,000 euros per year. Incentives were given for meeting objectives (41%), individual performance (39%), and company performance (17%).

Nearly a quarter of those receiving bonuses said they were given out quarterly, while 20% said they got them annually.

The most common bonus structure in Italy is an annual sum paid out in two instalments, with the first coming at the end of the year and the second in July.

This is followed by a single payment made at the end of the year. In terms of non-monetary benefits, the most popular perks among Italian workers are flexible working hours (43%), telecommuting (17%), and private healthcare insurance (16%).

Types of Rewards

Individual Bonuses Based on Performance

This type of bonus is determined by the results achieved by each employee in their role within the company. The amount of the bonus will be directly linked to how an individual has performed and how this has impacted the business.

Individual bonuses are good rewards especially for those who have gone above and beyond their usual job role in order to help the company succeed. This type of bonus can also act as a good motivator for other employees who see that their hard work is being recognised and rewarded.

Company Performance-Based Bonuses

This type of bonus is determined by how well the company as a whole has performed over a certain period of time. This could be linked to financial results, customer satisfaction levels or any other metric that the company uses to measure success.

Company performance-based bonuses are excellent for all employees because they encourage teamwork and a sense of responsibility for the company’s success. They also ensure that everyone is working towards the same goal and that everyone feels like they are part of something larger.

Goals-Achieved Bonuses

This type of bonus is given to employees when they have helped the company achieve a specific goal. This could be anything from hitting a certain sales target to launching a new product successfully.

Goals-achieved bonuses help to focus employees on the tasks that are most important to the company and ensure that they are working towards achieving these goals.

Seasonal / Year-End Bonuses

This type of bonus is given to employees at the end of a specific period, usually at the end of the financial year or during the holiday season.

Seasonal/year-end bonuses are a great way to show appreciation for all the hard work that employees have put in over the course of the year. They also help to motivate employees to continue working hard in the future.

A Comparison of Bonuses Based on Various Career Choices in Italy

What makes a job worth the high pay and generous bonuses?

Some jobs in Italy have high average salaries, while others boast high bonuses. Here’s a list of some of the best-paid jobs in Italy and how their bonuses compare:

  • Sales Professionals: Average salary of €80,000 with a bonus of up to €20,000
  • Marketing Managers: Average salary of €70,000 with a bonus of up to €15,000
  • Product Managers: Average salary of €65,000 with a bonus of up to €12,500
  • Investment Bankers: Average salary of €60,000 with a bonus of up to €10,000

In order to make more money in Italy, it is advisable to pursue a career in sales or marketing. With the right skill set, one can easily earn a six-figure salary and bonuses that can amount to over €20,000.

Product managers also fare well in terms of earnings, with an average salary of €65,000. Those working in the financial sector can also expect to earn a good wage, with investment bankers averaging €60,000 per year.

Comparison of Bonuses based on Seniority Level in Italy

The average salary in Italy can vary based on a number of factors, including your experience level and the industry you work in. However, there are some general trends that can be observed when it comes to bonuses and salaries in Italy.

For example, entry-level employees tend to receive lower bonuses than more experienced workers. This is because bonuses are often tied to productivity or company performance, and entry-level employees typically have less impact on these factors.

Similarly, workers in industries that are struggling may also receive lower bonuses than those in booming sectors. This is because companies are often more likely to invest in employee retention in industries with high demand for labor.

Finally, it’s worth noting that salaries and bonuses can vary significantly based on region. For instance, workers in Milan tend to earn more than those in other parts of Italy. This is likely due to the city’s status as a financial and business hub.

With all of this in mind, let’s take a look at the average bonus amounts that workers receive based on their seniority level and industry in Italy.

Salary Levels in Italy’s Most Popular Professions

Architecture

  • Architect – 4,460 EUR
  • CAD Drafter – 1,930 EUR
  • Interior Designer – 2,560 EUR

Construction

  • Construction Manager – 4,090 EUR
  • Construction Worker – 1,780 EUR
  • Electrician – 2,040 EUR
  • Plumber – 1,940 EUR

IT and Software Development

  • IT Project Manager – 5,280 EUR
  • Software Engineer – 3,650 EUR
  • Web Developer – 2,540 EUR

Sales

  • Sales Manager – 4,700 EUR
  • Sales Representative – 2,970 EUR

Business and Finance

  • Financial Analyst – 4,180 EUR
  • Accountant- 3.550 EUR

Human Resources

  • HR Manager- 5.450 EUR
  • Recruiter- 3.800 EUR

Italy City Wages

Rome has an average salary of 4,300 EUR and it is the highest-paid city in Italy. The second-highest-paid city is Milan, with an average salary of 4,200 EUR. Turin is the third-highest paid city, with an average salary of 3,900 EUR.

The average salary in Italy varies depending on the city you live in. Rome is the highest-paid city, followed by Milan and Turin. The lowest salaries can be found in Bologna and Naples.

Italy’s minimum wage is 9.19 EUR per hour and 1,497.98 EUR per month for full-time work. This means that a person working 40 hours per week would earn a minimum of 2,158.80 EUR per month before taxes.

Income taxes in Italy are progressive, with higher earners paying a higher percentage of their income in taxes. The highest marginal tax rate is 43%, which applies to incomes over 75,000 EUR.

Italy’s social security system includes a number of benefits, such as pensions, disability benefits, and healthcare. Employees and employers both contribute to the social security system through payroll taxes.

The cost of living in Italy varies depending on the city you live in. Rome and Milan are the most expensive cities, while Bologna and Naples are the least expensive.

Italy Hourly Pay

In Italy, the average hourly earning is 21 EUR. As a result, the typical Italian earns around 21 EUR for every hour of labor. The average salary in Italy is approximately 439 EUR per week. The median salary in Italy is 420 EUR per week, which means that half of the population earns more than this amount while the other half earns less.

The average Italian worker puts in about 35 hours of work per week. This is slightly higher than the OECD average of 34 hours. Italians work an average of 1,744 hours per year, which is lower than the OECD average of 1,775 hours.

When it comes to vacation time, Italians are entitled to a minimum of 4 weeks (20 days) of paid vacation per year. This is in line with the OECD average of 4 weeks (20 days).

Comparing Government and Private Sector Wages in Italy

On average, public sector workers in Italy are paid 5% more than their private-sector colleagues. In fact, government employees earn a gross monthly wage of €2,146, while private-sector workers earn an average of €2,034.

This difference is even more pronounced when comparing the salaries of high-ranking officials and top executives. For example, the President of the Republic earns a gross salary of €240,000 per year, while the Prime Minister earns €170,000. By contrast, the average salary for a member of parliament is €6,200 per month.

In general, public sector workers in Italy enjoy higher wages and better benefits than private-sector workers. For example, government employees are entitled to 13 months of pay (compared to 12 for private-sector workers), as well as 5 weeks of paid vacation per year (compared to 4 for private-sector workers).

Despite these advantages, public sector workers in Italy are not immune to the country’s economic problems. In fact, many government employees have seen their wages frozen or reduced in recent years as a result of austerity measures. And while the unemployment rate in Italy is currently 11.1%, the jobless rate for public sector workers is even higher, at 12.4%.

So while public sector workers in Italy may enjoy some advantages over their private-sector counterparts, they are not immune to the country’s economic challenges.

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